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Bitter Veils of Solemnity

Monument to the Rindge family in Cortland Rural Cemetery, 110 Tompkins Street, Cortland, Cortland County, New York. Four open books and four headstones mark the final resting place of Celeste (1840-1919), Henry D. (1839-1908), Lena (1870-1918), and Stella B. (1867-1936) Rindge. It looks like something was written in each book, but the lettering was unfortunately faded beyond comprehension. This is among the neatest family plots I’ve ever seen.

Cortland Rural Cemetery was established in 1853 and contains the remains of over 18,000 departed residents. Its drive is lined with wonderfully informative interpretive signs with information about prominent burials, interesting monuments, and the materials from which those monuments were made.

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To Bid You Farewell

Mausoleum for the Sabey family in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. John Sabey, Sr. (1800-1873) was an Anglo-American hat maker. His son, John Sabey, Jr. (1829–1904) got into trouble when he went bankrupt in 1880 and his creditors accused him of conspiring to commit fraud with his brother and their bookkeeper. He attempted suicide, but survived to the ripe old age of 75.

Oakwood Cemetery was designed by landscape architect Howard Daniels and opened in 1859. It is a secular Victorian “rural” or “garden” style cemetery where over 60,000 people are interred in 160 wooded acres.

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The Apostle in Triumph

Monument for Ira A. (1811-1870) and Esther (1816-1898) Cobb in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. This combination of an anchor tied to a Greek column makes for a unique and interesting monument. Ira was born in Connecticut but came to Onondaga County at an early age. He was a supporter of the antislavery and temperance movements and a member of the Reformed Dutch Church. An anchor in cemetery symbolism is strongly associated with Christianity.

Oakwood Cemetery was designed by landscape architect Howard Daniels and opened in 1859. It is a secular Victorian “rural” or “garden” style cemetery where over 60,000 people are interred in 160 wooded acres.

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Requiem

Abandoned gatekeeper’s office and house in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. There is very little information online about this building, however, I’ve read it was designed by H. Q. French and Co. and built circa 1927.

Oakwood Cemetery was designed by landscape architect Howard Daniels and opened in 1859. It is a secular Victorian “rural” or “garden” style cemetery where over 60,000 people are interred in 160 wooded acres.

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The Twilight is My Robe

Mausoleum for the Green family in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. At least three generations of Greens are interred here, most prominently John A. Green (1828-1872) and his wife Jane (1800-1889). John was supposedly a brigadier general in command of a Union “24th Brigade” during the American Civil War, but scant information exists online about that particular unit. General Benjamin Butler mentioned him in his memoirs as a “confidential friend of the governor.” He was a founding member of the Onondaga Historical Association.

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Silence of the Passed

Headstone for Nellie Hogan Gray (1861-1880) in Oakwood Cemetery, 50 101st Street, Troy, Rensselaer County, New York. Nellie was the wife of George W. Gray and died at the age of 19, however, she is not buried with her spouse. The inscription reads:

Loving wife you left me here alone
without a friend my sorrow to condole
If in Heaven’s bliss we meet once more
with you I will stay and hurt never more

“Condole” means to express sympathy with a person who is suffering sorrow, misfortune, or grief.

This 300-acre cemetery was established in 1848 and designed in rural style. It offers a beautiful view of the Hudson Valley and contains the remains of over 16,000 people, including Samuel “Uncle Sam” Wilson.

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