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Bitter Veils of Solemnity

Monument to the Rindge family in Cortland Rural Cemetery, 110 Tompkins Street, Cortland, Cortland County, New York. Four open books and four headstones mark the final resting place of Celeste (1840-1919), Henry D. (1839-1908), Lena (1870-1918), and Stella B. (1867-1936) Rindge. It looks like something was written in each book, but the lettering was unfortunately faded beyond comprehension. This is among the neatest family plots I’ve ever seen.

Cortland Rural Cemetery was established in 1853 and contains the remains of over 18,000 departed residents. Its drive is lined with wonderfully informative interpretive signs with information about prominent burials, interesting monuments, and the materials from which those monuments were made.

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Letting Go of Tonight

Headstones for Charles (1849-1909) and Alida S. (1853-1935) Edmondston and their son in Bonaventure Cemetery, 330 Bonaventure Road, Savannah, Chatham County, Georgia. Their son, Charles (1880–1914), died at the age of 33.

John Mullryne’s plantation, with its tree-lined avenues, once occupied this 160-acre site. Mullryne was an English colonel who was granted the land in the 1760s. He named it “Bonaventure,” which is Italian for “good fortune.” Peter Wiltberger purchased Bonaventure in 1846 and his son William turned it into Evergreen Cemetery 22 years later. The haunting, picturesque scenery led one statue, called “Bird Girl,” to appear on the cover of John Berendt’s novel Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil (1994).

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Under Ebony Shades

Sarcophagus for an unknown individual in Church Street Graveyard, at Monroe Street and S. Washington Avenue, in Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama.

Church Street Graveyard was established in 1819 and closed in 1898, although a few burials have taken place since then. It is known for the Boyington Oak, which according to legend sprouted over the grave of convicted murderer Charles R.S. Boyington. Passersby have reported hearing sighs, sobbing, and even the voice of Charles Boyington himself proclaiming his innocence.

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When the Sun Sleeps

Bacon family plot in Bonaventure Cemetery, 330 Bonaventure Road, Savannah, Chatham County, Georgia. There are at least eight members of the Bacon family interred here, including Albert Sumner Bacon (1844-1920) and his wife Ruby Williams (1845-1929). Albert S. Bacon served in B Co., 8th Georgia Volunteer Infantry Regiment during the American Civil War. The 8th Georgia was in Maj. Gen. John Bell Hood’s Division in Longstreet’s Corps. Albert was severely wounded in the face on July 2, 1863 at the Battle of Gettysburg, but survived the war and lived to be 76.

John Mullryne’s plantation, with its tree-lined avenues, once occupied this 160-acre site. Mullryne was an English colonel who was granted the land in the 1760s. He named it “Bonaventure,” which is Italian for “good fortune.” Peter Wiltberger purchased Bonaventure in 1846 and his son William turned it into Evergreen Cemetery 22 years later. The haunting, picturesque scenery led one statue, called “Bird Girl,” to appear on the cover of John Berendt’s novel Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil (1994).

References

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Indwelling Ascent

Grave marker for the Moss family in Bachelor’s Grove Cemetery in Rubio Woods Forest Preserve, Midlothian, Cook County, Illinois. There are at least seven members of the Moss family buried in Bachelor’s Grove, but due to extensive vandalism, the exact locations of their graves is unknown.

Bachelor’s Grove is one of the most famous haunted cemeteries in America. It was abandoned in the early-twentieth century and is allegedly home to a plethora of strange phenomenon, including the White Lady (or Madonna) of Bachelor’s Grove, who is said to be searching for her lost infant.

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Shadowed Dreams

Grave markers for the Weeks family in Church Street Graveyard, at Monroe Street and S. Washington Avenue, in Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama. There are at least a dozen members of the Weeks family buried here, including Cyril Nicholas Weeks (1805-1866) and his wife Melanie Victoria Chaudron (1815-1885).

Church Street Graveyard was established in 1819 and closed in 1898, although a few burials have taken place since then. It is known for the Boyington Oak, which according to legend sprouted over the grave of convicted murderer Charles R.S. Boyington. Passersby have reported hearing sighs, sobbing, and even the voice of Charles Boyington himself proclaiming his innocence.

References