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To Bid You Farewell

Mausoleum for the Sabey family in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. John Sabey, Sr. (1800-1873) was an Anglo-American hat maker. His son, John Sabey, Jr. (1829–1904) got into trouble when he went bankrupt in 1880 and his creditors accused him of conspiring to commit fraud with his brother and their bookkeeper. He attempted suicide, but survived to the ripe old age of 75.

Oakwood Cemetery was designed by landscape architect Howard Daniels and opened in 1859. It is a secular Victorian “rural” or “garden” style cemetery where over 60,000 people are interred in 160 wooded acres.

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The Apostle in Triumph

Monument for Ira A. (1811-1870) and Esther (1816-1898) Cobb in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. This combination of an anchor tied to a Greek column makes for a unique and interesting monument. Ira was born in Connecticut but came to Onondaga County at an early age. He was a supporter of the antislavery and temperance movements and a member of the Reformed Dutch Church. An anchor in cemetery symbolism is strongly associated with Christianity.

Oakwood Cemetery was designed by landscape architect Howard Daniels and opened in 1859. It is a secular Victorian “rural” or “garden” style cemetery where over 60,000 people are interred in 160 wooded acres.

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The Neverending Sleep

The final resting place of Rinaldo (1883-1943) and Anita (1872-1945) Albertini in Green Mount Cemetery at 250 State Street (U.S. Route 2) in the City of Montpelier, Washington County, Vermont, on bluffs along the north bank of the Winooski River.

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Keywords: Green Mount Cemetery, Montpelier, Washington County, Vermont, Rinaldo Albertini, Anita Albertini, granite sculpture, column, cemetery art, female figure, Italian

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Shadowed Dreams

Grave markers for the Weeks family in Church Street Graveyard, at Monroe Street and S. Washington Avenue, in Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama. There are at least a dozen members of the Weeks family buried here, including Cyril Nicholas Weeks (1805-1866) and his wife Melanie Victoria Chaudron (1815-1885).

Church Street Graveyard was established in 1819 and closed in 1898, although a few burials have taken place since then. It is known for the Boyington Oak, which according to legend sprouted over the grave of convicted murderer Charles R.S. Boyington. Passersby have reported hearing sighs, sobbing, and even the voice of Charles Boyington himself proclaiming his innocence.

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From the Void

Mausoleum for Charles Rau and family in Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mount Hope Avenue, Rochester, Monroe County, New York. Interred here are Charles (1823-1911) and his wife Elizabeth (1809-1889), her daughter Arabella (unk-1887), and her daughter’s husband Emil Reisky (1845-1907). Charles Rau founded the Genesee Brewing Company (now High Falls Brewing Company) in 1878. He worked for Elizabeth’s first husband, George Marburger, but the two married after he died. Elizabeth’s daughter by her first marriage, Arabella, married Rau’s business partner, Emil Reisky.

Mount Hope Cemetery, adjacent to the University of Rochester, was founded in 1838 as a municipal rural cemetery and sprawls over 196 acres. More than 350,000 former residents are interred there, including abolitionist Frederick Douglass, suffragette Susan B. Anthony, and city founder Nathaniel Rochester.

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Left Unspoken

Monument to Maj. Gen. Joseph B. Carr in Oakwood Cemetery, 50 101st Street, Troy, Rensselaer County, New York. During the Civil War, Carr commanded a brigade in the Union Army of the Potomac at the battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg. He was wounded near the Peach Orchard at Gettysburg and went on to command a division in the Union Army of the James. He was promoted to major general in March 1865, just before the end of the war. He also served as Secretary of State of New York for five years.

This 300-acre cemetery was established in 1848 and designed in rural style. It offers a beautiful view of the Hudson Valley and contains the remains of over 16,000 people, including Samuel “Uncle Sam” Wilson.

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