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Inez Clarke Memorial

Memorial to Inez Clarke, daughter of John and Mary C. Clarke, sculpted by Andrew Gagel in 1881. Graceland Cemetery, 4001 N Clark Street, Chicago, Illinois.

The statue is a life-sized re-creation of Inez Clarke, who was six years old when she died. Not much is known about her life, but there are many reports of her statue vanishing from inside the glass case. Stranger still, Helen Sclair, a local cemetery expert, believes Inez Clark is not buried at that location, and that the statue was a gift to the Clarkes from the sculptor to showcase his work.

Another researcher believes the statue is of Inez Briggs, the daughter of Mrs. Clarke from a previous marriage. Whether or not Inez’s mortal remains are at rest under her statue, it continues to be a place of pilgrimage for many Chicagoans.

Keywords: John Clarke, Chicago, Illinois, Mary C. Clarke, Andrew Gagel, glass case, limestone statue, cemetery sculpture, child, urban legend

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Eternal Silence

A bronze statue of a cloaked figure, called “Eternal Silence,” marks the burial place of Dexter Graves. According to legend, visitors who look into the face of the cloaked figure will be granted a vision of their own death. Graceland Cemetery, 4001 N Clark Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Keywords: Dexter Graves, Eternal Silence, Chicago, Illinois, bronze statue, bronze sculpture, cemetery sculpture, Loredo Taft

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Walking Death

Designed by Albin Polasek, “The Pilgrim” is a bronze statue, now stained green, of an elderly woman walking toward the mausoleum belonging to the Stejskal-Buchal family. It’s now sometimes simply called “Death” or “Walking Death.” Bohemian National Cemetery, 5255 N. Pulaski Road, Chicago, Illinois.

Keywords: Albin Polasek, Walking Death, Stejskal-Buchal, Bohemian National Cemetery, Chicago, Illinois, bronze statue, statue of death, death personified, cemetery sculpture

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