Close
Copyright Memento-Mori.co

Empirical Choirs

Memorial to Lost Children in Marco Island Cemetery, 489 West Elkcam Circle, Marco, Collier County, Florida.

In the early 1970s, less than 4,000 people lived on Marco Island. Many had left earlier in the century due to economic hardship and the Great Depression. Old Marco Cemetery, as it was called at the time, was all but abandoned, left to nature and the social outcasts who came there to drink and race dirt bikes and motorcycles along its trails.

On April 10, 1973, two teenage girls, Linda Walters and Lisa Nankevill, committed suicide near the cemetery. The incident shocked the tight-knit community, particularly because they seemed like typical American high school girls. Outrage by the senselessness of the act, local residents banded together to reclaim the cemetery.

Today, a loving memorial to lost children, featuring a cherubic angel with open arms, stands in the garden-like cemetery. The road running past the cemetery is heavily traveled, and many visitors come and go without ever knowing of the tragedy that took place there some 42 years ago.

References

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

Elk’s Rest

Statue entitled “Elk’s Rest” in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. “Elks Rest” was a gift from Miles S. Hencle as a tribute to his mother, Eliza T. Hencle. It marks the final resting place of Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks members who died while living in the Elks National Home in Bedford, Virginia, where there is a similar statue.

Oakwood Cemetery was designed by landscape architect Howard Daniels and opened in 1859. It is a secular Victorian “rural” or “garden” style cemetery where over 60,000 people are interred in 160 wooded acres.

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

Statue entitled “Elks Rest” in Oakwood Cemetery in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York.

References:

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

Physician Heal Thyself

Memorial to Charles Donley Miller (1895-1947) in Brookside Cemetery, at Watertown Center Loop and Brookside Drive, Watertown, Jefferson County, New York. This unique monument features a caduceus, the staff carried by Hermes in Greek mythology and used to symbolize commerce. It’s also sometimes incorrectly used to represent the medical trade, particularly ironic in this instance because the inscription around the pedestal reads: “homeopathic physician.”

References

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

Sorrow of Forgotten Pride

The Haggerty Lion in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. Designed by Thomas Haggerty for his brother, Michael (1960-1974), this bronze lion is a National Smithsonian registered sculptural landmark and a favorite destination for visitors to Oakwood Cemetery. The sculpture was placed here in 1982.

Oakwood Cemetery was designed by landscape architect Howard Daniels and opened in 1859. It is a secular Victorian “rural” or “garden” style cemetery where over 60,000 people are interred in 160 wooded acres.

References:

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

The Crestfallen Amaranth

Monument to John (1835-1919), Dora (1833-1905), and Amelia (1864-1941) Nill in Brookside Cemetery, at Watertown Center Loop and Brookside Drive, Watertown, Jefferson County, New York. John Nill was a German immigrant from Nehren, Kingdom of Wurtemberg. He was a baker and cigar manufacturer by trade, Freemason, and mayor of Watertown in 1888. The inscription on his monument reads:

Humanity is our creed. To do good is our religion. The world is our home.

References

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

The Artist

Memorial to Thomas (1823-1903) and Minerva (1824-1889) Wood in Green Mount Cemetery at 250 State Street (U.S. Route 2) in the City of Montpelier, Washington County, Vermont, on bluffs along the north bank of the Winooski River. Thomas Waterman Wood was a prominent rural artist and president of the National Academy of Design.

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

Keywords: Green Mount Cemetery, Montpelier, Washington County, Vermont, artist, painter, easel, relief, portrait, Minerva “Minnie” Robinson Wood, Thomas Waterman Wood, First Congregational Church

Sources: