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Skyward Gaze, Earthward Touch

Memorial for H. Annie Marshall (1879-1890) in Elmwood (Centralia) Cemetery on Gragg Street, Centralia, Marion County, Illinois. Originally called Centralia Cemetery, this graveyard was in use in the 1860s but not officially established until 1877. Its name was changed to Elmwood Cemetery in 1921.

Deep inside Elmwood sits a large, granite monument shaped like a tabernacle or an ancient Greek temple with four columns. At the top of the monument stands a nearly life-sized statue of a young girl with flowing locks of hair. In her hands she holds a violin. The statue depicts Harriet Annie, the daughter of Dr. Winfield and Eoline Marshall. Annie died of diphtheria in 1890, a few weeks after her eleventh birthday.

A popular local legend maintains that the sweet strains of a violin can be heard emanating from the cemetery at night. The origin of these ethereal notes is said to be none other than the statue of “Violin Annie.”  Some locals also believe that Annie’s statue glows on Halloween night.

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To Bid You Farewell

Mausoleum for the Sabey family in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. John Sabey, Sr. (1800-1873) was an Anglo-American hat maker. His son, John Sabey, Jr. (1829–1904) got into trouble when he went bankrupt in 1880 and his creditors accused him of conspiring to commit fraud with his brother and their bookkeeper. He attempted suicide, but survived to the ripe old age of 75.

Oakwood Cemetery was designed by landscape architect Howard Daniels and opened in 1859. It is a secular Victorian “rural” or “garden” style cemetery where over 60,000 people are interred in 160 wooded acres.

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The Apostle in Triumph

Monument for Ira A. (1811-1870) and Esther (1816-1898) Cobb in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. This combination of an anchor tied to a Greek column makes for a unique and interesting monument. Ira was born in Connecticut but came to Onondaga County at an early age. He was a supporter of the antislavery and temperance movements and a member of the Reformed Dutch Church. An anchor in cemetery symbolism is strongly associated with Christianity.

Oakwood Cemetery was designed by landscape architect Howard Daniels and opened in 1859. It is a secular Victorian “rural” or “garden” style cemetery where over 60,000 people are interred in 160 wooded acres.

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Illusion’s Play

Headstone for Edward LeRoy Tabler (1840-1866) in Aux Sable Cemetery, on Brown Road south of E. Shady Oaks Road, Minooka, Grundy County, Illinois. Edward served in Company K, 51st Illinois Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War. The 51st Illinois was in Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard’s IV Corps in the Union Army of the Cumberland during the Atlanta Campaign. Edward survived the war, only to get kicked in the head by a mule and die at the age of 25.

Aux Sable is a quaint, garden-like cemetery tucked in the woods near Aux Sable Creek. The nearby town of Minooka was platted in 1852, so the cemetery probably dates back to that time. Despite an otherwise mundane existence, it continues to be an incubator for ghost stories. The most notable concerns the ghost of a young girl that has been seen lurking around the cemetery. A remote cemetery, hidden from prying eyes and a favorite drinking spot for teens, was a natural incubator for such rumors.

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