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And the Rest is Silence

Tombstone row in Cherry Hill Cemetery at Main Street and Christian Hill Road, north of the White River and east of Bethel, Windsor County, Vermont. Closely-packed rows of headstones from the mid-19th Century are common in old Vermont cemeteries. The leftmost headstone belongs to Mary Ann Newell, who died in 1855 when she was 27.

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Sunshine Epitaph

Headstones adorn Bemis Cemetery, on a hill just north of County Road 22 and Hull Road, south of Pulpit Rock State Forest, in Jefferson County, New York. The Oswegatchie River flows north of this intersection. The local Masonic lodge graciously cleaned up this burial ground recently.

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Fade of Existence

Tombstones crowd Woods Hill (Dorman) Cemetery at St. Albans Road (U.S. Route 7) and Woods Hill Road south of Swanton, Franklin County, Vermont, and the Missisquoi River. Densely packed gravestones from the mid-19th Century are common in old Vermont cemeteries. This one contains the graves of several Revolutionary War veterans.

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Over the Desolate Land

Broken headstones pepper the Van Deusen & Lansing Family Burial Ground (aka Old Johnstown Road Cemetery) on Old Johnstown Road, just north of Old Trail Road, south of Johnstown, Fulton County, New York. There are approximately a dozen or more burials in this small plot, but most of the stones are broken and unreadable. It appear to have been in use during the mid-19th Century.

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