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The Last

Unknown graves in Happy Valley Pioneer Cemetery, off Britton Road west of the North Branch Little Salmon River, Happy Valley Wildlife Management Area, Oswego County, New York. In the 1800s, this area was home to a hamlet called Happy Valley. Little remains of this once thriving community. During the Great Depression, the government bought up foreclosed farms to form the basis of this game reserve.

This small cemetery is hidden in the woods down a side trial. The graves are marked with simple stones, and there are no visible markings to indicate who is buried there. There appear to be approximately ten burials, although some of these could be headstones and footstones. Two square granite stones marked with single letters may be boundary or lot markers.

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As Death Consumes the Earth

Tombstones crowd Woods Hill (Dorman) Cemetery at St. Albans Road (U.S. Route 7) and Woods Hill Road south of Swanton, Franklin County, Vermont, and the Missisquoi River. Densely packed gravestones from the mid-19th Century are common in old Vermont cemeteries. This one contains the graves of several Revolutionary War veterans.

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Desolate Future

The tiny family plot in Warner Cemetery at St. Albans Road (U.S. Route 7) and Jewett Avenue north of St. Albans City, Franklin County, Vermont. There are approximately 12 headstones in this roadside graveyard, including one obelisk belonging to 11-year-old Louisa A. Warner (1837-1848). Most of the burials seem to have taken place in the mid-to-late 19th Century.

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And the Rest is Silence

Tombstone row in Cherry Hill Cemetery at Main Street and Christian Hill Road, north of the White River and east of Bethel, Windsor County, Vermont. Closely-packed rows of headstones from the mid-19th Century are common in old Vermont cemeteries. The leftmost headstone belongs to Mary Ann Newell, who died in 1855 when she was 27.

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