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Is Fuair an Chroí

Monument to the Marrion family in St. Joseph Cemetery off Archibald Street in Burlington, Chittenden County, Vermont, just south of the Winooski River and U.S. Route 7. St. Joseph is the oldest Catholic cemetery in Burlington, and was used primarily for Irish Catholics. Buried here are James T. Marrion (1868-1926), Katherine Delany Marrion (1870-1939), and their young daughter Natalie D. (1895-1900). James Marrion was a granite manufacturer in Barre, south of Montpelier.

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The Pale Haunt Departure

Monument to the Pierre Frederic Mairet family in Hillside Memorial Cemetery, 723 N Main Street, Central Square, Oswego County, New York. James Roosevelt established Hillside in 1822 as Village Cemetery and became Hillside during the Civil War. Buried here are Pierre Frederic (1824-1886) and Louise (1830-1887) Mairet, their daughter Emma A. (1860-1891), and three infant sons.

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One Last Time

Monument to Brig. Gen. Adolph von Steinwehr in Albany Rural Cemetery, on Cemetery Avenue off NY State Route 32, in Menands, Albany County, New York. Adolph von Steinwehr (1822-1877) was born in the Duchy of Brunswick, trained as a Prussian officer, and emigrated to America in 1847. He raised a German-American regiment during the Civil War and rose to command a division in the Union XI Corps, Army of the Potomac. Unfortunately, his division bore the brunt of successful Confederate attacks at the Battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and he was later demoted to command of a brigade. After the war, he became a well-known and respected cartographer.

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When the Battle’s Over

Monument to Frederick F. Wead (1835-1864) in Morningside Cemetery off Raymond Street and U.S. Route 11 in the town of Malone, Franklin County, New York. Colonel Frederick Fuller Wead commanded the 98th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment at the Battle of Cold Harbor during the American Civil War. He was wounded on June 2, 1864, then returned to battle against surgeon’s orders and died leading his regiment.

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All Life Ends

Monument to Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) in Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mount Hope Avenue, Rochester, Monroe County, New York. Frederick Douglass was born into slavery in Maryland, escaped to Massachusetts in 1838, and became an abolitionist. His autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (1845), was popular in the North, and Douglass quickly became a leading voice in the antislavery movement.

Mount Hope Cemetery, adjacent to the University of Rochester, was founded in 1838 as a municipal rural cemetery and sprawls over 196 acres. More than 350,000 former residents are interred there, including abolitionist Frederick Douglass, suffragette Susan B. Anthony, and city founder Nathaniel Rochester.

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Time Waits for No One

Monument for Henry and Marie Chapin in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. Henry Winfield Chapin (1867-1954) and his wife Marie Arnold Chapin (1873-1956) are interred in the shadow of these beautiful Greek Corinthian columns. Henry was president of the Brown-Lipe Chapin Company, which manufactured automobile parts for Ford Motors and Yellow Cab.

Oakwood Cemetery was designed by landscape architect Howard Daniels and opened in 1859. It is a secular Victorian “rural” or “garden” style cemetery where over 60,000 people are interred in 160 wooded acres.

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