Close
Copyright Memento-Mori.co

Past Shadows

Memorial to Maj. Gen. Edwin Vose “Bull” Sumner (1797-1863) in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York.

Sumner was born in Boston and became the oldest Union general in the American Civil War. He commanded the II Corps in the Army of the Potomac and fought at several major battles, including Antietam and Fredericksburg, and earned the nickname “bull” because of a legend that a bullet bounced off his head. He died of illness in Syracuse, NY in 1863.

Oakwood Cemetery was designed by landscape architect Howard Daniels and opened in 1859. It is a secular Victorian “rural” or “garden” style cemetery where over 60,000 people are interred in 160 wooded acres.

References:

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

Left Unspoken

Monument to Maj. Gen. Joseph B. Carr in Oakwood Cemetery, 50 101st Street, Troy, Rensselaer County, New York. During the Civil War, Carr commanded a brigade in the Union Army of the Potomac at the battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg. He was wounded near the Peach Orchard at Gettysburg and went on to command a division in the Union Army of the James. He was promoted to major general in March 1865, just before the end of the war. He also served as Secretary of State of New York for five years.

This 300-acre cemetery was established in 1848 and designed in rural style. It offers a beautiful view of the Hudson Valley and contains the remains of over 16,000 people, including Samuel “Uncle Sam” Wilson.

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

References

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

The Artist

Memorial to Thomas (1823-1903) and Minerva (1824-1889) Wood in Green Mount Cemetery at 250 State Street (U.S. Route 2) in the City of Montpelier, Washington County, Vermont, on bluffs along the north bank of the Winooski River. Thomas Waterman Wood was a prominent rural artist and president of the National Academy of Design.

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

Keywords: Green Mount Cemetery, Montpelier, Washington County, Vermont, artist, painter, easel, relief, portrait, Minerva “Minnie” Robinson Wood, Thomas Waterman Wood, First Congregational Church

Sources:

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

Nothing Earthly Save the Thrill

Monument to the Rosenthal family in Woodlawn Cemetery, 800 Grant Boulevard, Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. At least six Rosenthals are interred in the shadow of this neoclassical monument, most of whom died in the first three decades of the twentieth century, including Moses and Sarah Rosenthal and their four children. Woodlawn Cemetery was established in 1881 and serves as a quiet, well-maintained resting place for over 30,000 departed residents.

References

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

Slumber Evermore

This ornate Gothic monument is dedicated to W.W. Goulding (1809-1859) in Brookside Cemetery, at Watertown Center Loop and Brookside Drive, Watertown, Jefferson County, New York. I believe it was designed by L.L. Lewis and made from Potsdam Sandstone, a uniquely-reddish colored sandstone quarried in Upstate New York. The word “Mizpah” appears beneath his epitaph, signifying an emotional bond between two people separated by death.

References

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

Secrets Within the Shrine

Monument to the John Gregory Smith family in Greenwood Cemetery on South Main Street (U.S. Route 7) and St. Albans State Highway in St. Albans City, Franklin County, Vermont. The Smiths were a prominent family. John Gregory Smith (1818-1891) was governor of Vermont from 1863 to 1865, during the last years of the Civil War. John’s brother Worthington was a U.S. Congressman from 1867 to 1871, and his son Edward (1854-1935) was governor of Vermont from 1898 to 1900.

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

References: