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From the Void

Mausoleum for Charles Rau and family in Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mount Hope Avenue, Rochester, Monroe County, New York. Interred here are Charles (1823-1911) and his wife Elizabeth (1809-1889), her daughter Arabella (unk-1887), and her daughter’s husband Emil Reisky (1845-1907). Charles Rau founded the Genesee Brewing Company (now High Falls Brewing Company) in 1878. He worked for Elizabeth’s first husband, George Marburger, but the two married after he died. Elizabeth’s daughter by her first marriage, Arabella, married Rau’s business partner, Emil Reisky.

Mount Hope Cemetery, adjacent to the University of Rochester, was founded in 1838 as a municipal rural cemetery and sprawls over 196 acres. More than 350,000 former residents are interred there, including abolitionist Frederick Douglass, suffragette Susan B. Anthony, and city founder Nathaniel Rochester.

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Miles and Miles

Stephen W. Miles (1795-1859) was a violinist with pretensions of greatness. Bit by bit, he purchased over a thousand acres of bottom land along the Mississippi River and made a small fortune. Eventually, he built a mausoleum on a bluff in Eagle Cliff Cemetery in rural Monroe County, Illinois, where he could see his land “for miles and miles.” Completed in 1858, the mausoleum cost $25,000 and was made from Italian marble. It contained 56 burial vaults. Unfortunately, Miles’ son went bankrupt and lost his father’s estate.

Sometime during the 1950s, vandals desecrated the tomb, stole jewelry, and damaged the bodies of the Miles family. In the 1960s, a Satanic cult burned the rest of their remains in a bizarre attempt to resurrect them from the dead. Today, the grand mausoleum sits empty, but it is marred by graffiti and widely believed to be haunted by the angry spirits of the Miles family.

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In Longing

Mausoleum for T.S. Johnston and family in Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mount Hope Avenue, Rochester, Monroe County, New York. There are at least five Johnsons interred in this beautiful neoclassical mausoleum, including Thomas S. Johnston (unk-1915), his wife Mary Ann White (unk-1941), and sons, John White (unk-1959) and Thomas, Jr. (unk-1942). Thomas was a clothing merchant from Scotland and worked for Sibley, Lindsay & Curr Company.

Mount Hope Cemetery, adjacent to the University of Rochester, was founded in 1838 as a municipal rural cemetery and sprawls over 196 acres. More than 350,000 former residents are interred there, including abolitionist Frederick Douglass, suffragette Susan B. Anthony, and city founder Nathaniel Rochester.

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Dusk of an Infinite Shade

Burton family crypt or sepulcher in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. At least two generations of Burtons are interred here, including Burr (1804-1865) and Laura (1813-1892) Burton and their ten children. Burr was a salt manufacturer and state legislature who was murdered in his home by an unknown assailant. A stone staircase descends into the crypt below.

Oakwood Cemetery was designed by landscape architect Howard Daniels and opened in 1859. It is a secular Victorian “rural” or “garden” style cemetery where over 60,000 people are interred in 160 wooded acres.

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Aurora’s Garden

Mausoleum for the Jacobson family in Woodlawn Cemetery, 800 Grant Boulevard, Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. At least three generations of Jacobsons are interred here, including Henry H. Jacobson (unk-1923), his son Dr. Nathan Jacobson (unk-1913), and his granddaughter, Emma (unk-1956). Woodlawn Cemetery was established in 1881 and serves as a quiet, well-maintained resting place for over 30,000 departed residents.

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Won’t Find It Here

Mausoleum for Frederick and Margaret Wolf in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. Frederick Wolf (1841-1918) immigrated from Germany, opened a furniture store in Syracuse, and became a champion checker player. He is interred here with his parents, his wife Margaret (1843-1907), and their five children. Their mausoleum is a humble example of Egyptian Revival architecture. The winged sun over the door symbolizes the soul and its eternity.

Oakwood Cemetery was designed by landscape architect Howard Daniels and opened in 1859. It is a secular Victorian “rural” or “garden” style cemetery where over 60,000 people are interred in 160 wooded acres.

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