Close
Copyright Memento-Mori.co

Empirical Choirs

Memorial to Lost Children in Marco Island Cemetery, 489 West Elkcam Circle, Marco, Collier County, Florida.

In the early 1970s, less than 4,000 people lived on Marco Island. Many had left earlier in the century due to economic hardship and the Great Depression. Old Marco Cemetery, as it was called at the time, was all but abandoned, left to nature and the social outcasts who came there to drink and race dirt bikes and motorcycles along its trails.

On April 10, 1973, two teenage girls, Linda Walters and Lisa Nankevill, committed suicide near the cemetery. The incident shocked the tight-knit community, particularly because they seemed like typical American high school girls. Outrage by the senselessness of the act, local residents banded together to reclaim the cemetery.

Today, a loving memorial to lost children, featuring a cherubic angel with open arms, stands in the garden-like cemetery. The road running past the cemetery is heavily traveled, and many visitors come and go without ever knowing of the tragedy that took place there some 42 years ago.

References

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

Bitter Veils of Solemnity

Monument to the Rindge family in Cortland Rural Cemetery, 110 Tompkins Street, Cortland, Cortland County, New York. Four open books and four headstones mark the final resting place of Celeste (1840-1919), Henry D. (1839-1908), Lena (1870-1918), and Stella B. (1867-1936) Rindge. It looks like something was written in each book, but the lettering was unfortunately faded beyond comprehension. This is among the neatest family plots I’ve ever seen.

Cortland Rural Cemetery was established in 1853 and contains the remains of over 18,000 departed residents. Its drive is lined with wonderfully informative interpretive signs with information about prominent burials, interesting monuments, and the materials from which those monuments were made.

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

References

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

Skyward Gaze, Earthward Touch

Memorial for H. Annie Marshall (1879-1890) in Elmwood (Centralia) Cemetery on Gragg Street, Centralia, Marion County, Illinois. Originally called Centralia Cemetery, this graveyard was in use in the 1860s but not officially established until 1877. Its name was changed to Elmwood Cemetery in 1921.

Deep inside Elmwood sits a large, granite monument shaped like a tabernacle or an ancient Greek temple with four columns. At the top of the monument stands a nearly life-sized statue of a young girl with flowing locks of hair. In her hands she holds a violin. The statue depicts Harriet Annie, the daughter of Dr. Winfield and Eoline Marshall. Annie died of diphtheria in 1890, a few weeks after her eleventh birthday.

A popular local legend maintains that the sweet strains of a violin can be heard emanating from the cemetery at night. The origin of these ethereal notes is said to be none other than the statue of “Violin Annie.”  Some locals also believe that Annie’s statue glows on Halloween night.

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

References

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

To Bid You Farewell

Mausoleum for the Sabey family in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. John Sabey, Sr. (1800-1873) was an Anglo-American hat maker. His son, John Sabey, Jr. (1829–1904) got into trouble when he went bankrupt in 1880 and his creditors accused him of conspiring to commit fraud with his brother and their bookkeeper. He attempted suicide, but survived to the ripe old age of 75.

Oakwood Cemetery was designed by landscape architect Howard Daniels and opened in 1859. It is a secular Victorian “rural” or “garden” style cemetery where over 60,000 people are interred in 160 wooded acres.

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

References:

Copyright Memento-Mori.co

Letting Go of Tonight

Headstones for Charles (1849-1909) and Alida S. (1853-1935) Edmondston and their son in Bonaventure Cemetery, 330 Bonaventure Road, Savannah, Chatham County, Georgia. Their son, Charles (1880–1914), died at the age of 33.

John Mullryne’s plantation, with its tree-lined avenues, once occupied this 160-acre site. Mullryne was an English colonel who was granted the land in the 1760s. He named it “Bonaventure,” which is Italian for “good fortune.” Peter Wiltberger purchased Bonaventure in 1846 and his son William turned it into Evergreen Cemetery 22 years later. The haunting, picturesque scenery led one statue, called “Bird Girl,” to appear on the cover of John Berendt’s novel Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil (1994).

References