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Illusion’s Play

Headstone for Edward LeRoy Tabler (1840-1866) in Aux Sable Cemetery, on Brown Road south of E. Shady Oaks Road, Minooka, Grundy County, Illinois. Edward served in Company K, 51st Illinois Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War. The 51st Illinois was in Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard’s IV Corps in the Union Army of the Cumberland during the Atlanta Campaign. Edward survived the war, only to get kicked in the head by a mule and die at the age of 25.

Aux Sable is a quaint, garden-like cemetery tucked in the woods near Aux Sable Creek. The nearby town of Minooka was platted in 1852, so the cemetery probably dates back to that time. Despite an otherwise mundane existence, it continues to be an incubator for ghost stories. The most notable concerns the ghost of a young girl that has been seen lurking around the cemetery. A remote cemetery, hidden from prying eyes and a favorite drinking spot for teens, was a natural incubator for such rumors.

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Requiem

Abandoned gatekeeper’s office and house in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. There is very little information online about this building, however, I’ve read it was designed by H. Q. French and Co. and built circa 1927.

Oakwood Cemetery was designed by landscape architect Howard Daniels and opened in 1859. It is a secular Victorian “rural” or “garden” style cemetery where over 60,000 people are interred in 160 wooded acres.

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Under Ebony Shades

Sarcophagus for an unknown individual in Church Street Graveyard, at Monroe Street and S. Washington Avenue, in Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama.

Church Street Graveyard was established in 1819 and closed in 1898, although a few burials have taken place since then. It is known for the Boyington Oak, which according to legend sprouted over the grave of convicted murderer Charles R.S. Boyington. Passersby have reported hearing sighs, sobbing, and even the voice of Charles Boyington himself proclaiming his innocence.

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The Changing of Times

Headstone for “Red Bone” Johnson in Beauvoir Confederate Cemetery, 2244 Beach Boulevard, Biloxi, Harrison County, Mississippi. Johnson served in Company I, 31st Alabama. The 31st Alabama was garrisoned at Vicksburg and later joined the Confederate Army of the Tennessee, fought in the Atlanta Campaign, and marched with John Bell Hood into Tennessee in 1864.

The Jefferson Davis Soldiers Home opened on the grounds of Beauvoir Mansion, one-time home of former Confederate President Jefferson Davis, in 1903 and operated until the 1950s. It was home to around 1,800 Civil War veterans and widows of Confederate soldiers. Roughly 780 of them are buried in the cemetery located on the property.

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The Twilight is My Robe

Mausoleum for the Green family in Oakwood Cemetery, 940 Comstock Avenue, next to Syracuse University, in Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. At least three generations of Greens are interred here, most prominently John A. Green (1828-1872) and his wife Jane (1800-1889). John was supposedly a brigadier general in command of a Union “24th Brigade” during the American Civil War, but scant information exists online about that particular unit. General Benjamin Butler mentioned him in his memoirs as a “confidential friend of the governor.” He was a founding member of the Onondaga Historical Association.

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