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Cries of the Past

Headstone for J. H. Jackson (unk-1916) in Beauvoir Confederate Cemetery, 2244 Beach Boulevard, Biloxi, Harrison County, Mississippi. Jackson served in Co A, Ward’s Battery, an Alabama light artillery unit.

The Jefferson Davis Soldiers Home opened on the grounds of Beauvoir Mansion, one-time home of former Confederate President Jefferson Davis, in 1903 and operated until the 1950s. It was home to around 1,800 Civil War veterans and widows of Confederate soldiers. Roughly 780 of them are buried in the cemetery located on the property.

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Together at Last

Headstones for Paul (1734-1818) and Abigail McKinstry (unk-1802) in Cherry Hill Cemetery at Main Street and Christian Hill Road, north of the White River and east of Bethel, Windsor County, Vermont. Paul McKinstry fought for Connecticut as a private in the Revolutionary War. These 200-year-old headstones must have been cleaned recently; they’re remarkably well preserved.

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From the Void

Mausoleum for Charles Rau and family in Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mount Hope Avenue, Rochester, Monroe County, New York. Interred here are Charles (1823-1911) and his wife Elizabeth (1809-1889), her daughter Arabella (unk-1887), and her daughter’s husband Emil Reisky (1845-1907). Charles Rau founded the Genesee Brewing Company (now High Falls Brewing Company) in 1878. He worked for Elizabeth’s first husband, George Marburger, but the two married after he died. Elizabeth’s daughter by her first marriage, Arabella, married Rau’s business partner, Emil Reisky.

Mount Hope Cemetery, adjacent to the University of Rochester, was founded in 1838 as a municipal rural cemetery and sprawls over 196 acres. More than 350,000 former residents are interred there, including abolitionist Frederick Douglass, suffragette Susan B. Anthony, and city founder Nathaniel Rochester.

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The Last

Unknown graves in Happy Valley Pioneer Cemetery, off Britton Road west of the North Branch Little Salmon River, Happy Valley Wildlife Management Area, Oswego County, New York. In the 1800s, this area was home to a hamlet called Happy Valley. Little remains of this once thriving community. During the Great Depression, the government bought up foreclosed farms to form the basis of this game reserve.

This small cemetery is hidden in the woods down a side trial. The graves are marked with simple stones, and there are no visible markings to indicate who is buried there. There appear to be approximately ten burials, although some of these could be headstones and footstones. Two square granite stones marked with single letters may be boundary or lot markers.

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As Death Consumes the Earth

Tombstones crowd Woods Hill (Dorman) Cemetery at St. Albans Road (U.S. Route 7) and Woods Hill Road south of Swanton, Franklin County, Vermont, and the Missisquoi River. Densely packed gravestones from the mid-19th Century are common in old Vermont cemeteries. This one contains the graves of several Revolutionary War veterans.

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