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Neverwhere

Monument to Henry (1834-1897) and Helen (1835-1915) Likly and family in Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mount Hope Avenue, Rochester, Monroe County, New York. Henry, Canadian by birth, was a leather maker who co-founded Henry Likly & Co. (which became simply Likly’s in 1925). He sold leather suitcases, trunks, handbags, and other items.

Mount Hope Cemetery, adjacent to the University of Rochester, was founded in 1838 as a municipal rural cemetery and sprawls over 196 acres. More than 350,000 former residents are interred there, including abolitionist Frederick Douglass, suffragette Susan B. Anthony, and city founder Nathaniel Rochester.

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Sadness Rains

Statue for little Erma Kraft (1884-1887) in Woodlawn Cemetery, 800 Grant Boulevard, Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York. Erma was the only child of Julius and Maude Kraft. Woodlawn Cemetery was established in 1881 and serves as a quiet, well-maintained resting place for over 30,000 departed residents.

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Heart of Stone

Sarcophagus for Seth Glenn Young (1884-1925) in Herrin City Cemetery, 1320-1324 E. Stotlar Street, Herrin, Williamson County, Illinois. S. Glenn Young led a bizarre and fascinating life. He was a Prohibition Agent and Ku Klux Klan leader, hero to some and villain to others.

He came to Williamson County in 1923, hired by the Ku Klux Klan to enforce Prohibition in the county, despite having been officially suspended as a Prohibition Agent three years earlier for murdering someone on a raid.

Young and his Klansmen raided illegal roadhouses and arrested hundreds of people. They were accused of falsely imprisoning and even torturing prisoners. A war broke out between the KKK and bootleggers, and at one point Young took over the town of Herrin and proclaimed himself police chief.

The KKK expelled him from their organization, but a few months later, he was killed in a shootout and buried with a full Klan ceremony attended by thousands of people. There were 73 legal indictments against Young when he died.

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Desolate Future

The tiny family plot in Warner Cemetery at St. Albans Road (U.S. Route 7) and Jewett Avenue north of St. Albans City, Franklin County, Vermont. There are approximately 12 headstones in this roadside graveyard, including one obelisk belonging to 11-year-old Louisa A. Warner (1837-1848). Most of the burials seem to have taken place in the mid-to-late 19th Century.

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The Repentant

Receiving vaults in Albany Rural Cemetery, on Cemetery Avenue off NY State Route 32, in Menands, Albany County, New York. Built in 1858, receiving vaults were intended to temporarily house remains before burial, particularly during winter when the ground was too frozen to dig. Modern excavating equipment has rendered these structures obsolete. Designed by Major David Bates Douglass and established in 1841, Albany Rural is a 467-acre National Historic Landmark and the final resting place for over 135,000 people.

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